What Does “Board Certified” Mean?

Written by AskTheLawyers.com™ on behalf of Kathy McArthur with McArthur Law Firm.

What Does “Board Certified” Mean?
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What does it mean to be board certified, and why do you want to make sure your trial attorney is board certified? Attorney Kathy McArthur is board certified in civil trial advocacy by the National Board of Trial Advocacy.

A certified specialist for civil trial advocacy focuses on non-criminal litigation, such as personal injury or medical malpractice litigation. To earn board certification, an attorney must be involved in at least 45 days of trial, spending at least six hourson trial each day. During their trial experience, the attorney must serve as lead counsel in a specific number of jury cases, have a specific number of those cases proceed to verdict, conduct a specific number of direct and cross-examinations, a specific number of voir dire (preliminary examinations of witnesses or jurors by judge or counsel), in addition to opening statements and closing arguments.

The attorney must also actively participate in at least 100 additional contested matters, which can include things like welfare hearings, arbitration, and workers’ compensation matters.

In short, a board certified trial attorney is one that you can be certain is experienced in and dedicated to helping you with your civil legal matters.

Contact a board certified attorney who is not afraid to go to trial.

Many attorneys are afraid to go to trial and will instead only work toward settlement. While it is possible that a settlement may be enough to compensate damages caused by someone else’s negligence, having an attorney who is not afraid to go to trial increases the certainty that you will receive fair compensation for your losses.

If you have been injured due to someone else’s negligence, contact a board certified trial lawyer today.

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